Ending Human Trafficking Requires Everyone’s Efforts, Archbishop Says

Ending human trafficking requires everyone’s efforts, archbishop says
(Credit: Claus Tom Christensen via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).)
Archbishop Paul Richard Gallagher, the Vatican’s Secretary for Relations with States, emphasized the importance of “multi-pronged strategies” to prevent human trafficking and aid the affected victims, and he noted the special role of women and religious personnel in offering an avenue of trust. Speaking at the UN, the archbishop said the Catholic Church is collaborating “with both the public and private sectors, including with government authorities” to help fight the crime.

NEW YORK CITY – At a United Nations gathering in New York City, a Holy See official stressed the need for a multi-pronged approach in fighting human trafficking and aiding victims.

“The issue of trafficking in persons can only be fully addressed by promoting effective juridical instruments and concrete collaboration at multiple levels by all stakeholders,” Archbishop Paul Richard Gallagher told global leaders at a United Nations event on Tuesday.

Gallagher is the Holy See’s Secretary for Relations with States. He spoke at a High Level Leaders Event hosted by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, entitled, “A Call to Action to End Forced Labor, Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking.”

The archbishop emphasized the importance of “multi-pronged strategies” to prevent more of these crimes and aid the affected victims, and he noted the special role of women and religious personnel in offering an avenue of trust.

“Experience has shown that many victims are wary of trusting law enforcement authorities, but that they confide their stories more easily to religious personnel, especially religious sisters, who can build their trust in the legal process and provide them safe haven and other forms of assistance.”

 

To read the full post by Perry West of the Catholic News Agency: Click Here

Two Cuffed In Brooklyn Human-Trafficking Bust Could Be Part Of Larger Sex-Slavery Gang

The arrests of two people on sex trafficking charges in Brooklyn could be the tip of the iceberg, according to police sources who said the operation may be linked to a gang that has been forcing young girls into prostitution.

A 21-year-old man and a 20-year-old woman were arrested after a 16-year-old girl escaped their Crown Heights lair and told police that she and another teen were being held as sex slaves in an apartment where younger children also live.

“This is absolutely a case of human trafficking where these young girls were taken for profit and being forced to have sex for money,” a source said.

Cops said there are still a lot of unknowns, including the connection between the four younger children in the apartment and the people who were arrested.

 

To read the full story by Rocco Parascandola  and Molly Crane Newman on New York Daily News: Click Here

 

 

New York State Set To Ban Child Marriages

Gov. Cuomo called the child marriage ban a priority. (HANS PENNINK/AP)

ALBANY — New York will soon outlaw child marriages.

As lawmakers head into the final three weeks of the legislative session, the Assembly is expected to pass a bill as soon as this week raising the legal age at which a person in New York can marry.

Under current law, the age of consent in New York for marriage is 18. But someone as young as 14 can wed as long as they have parental and judicial consent.

The bill set to pass the Assembly would prohibit the marriage of minors under 17 years of age and require those 17 and 18 to get court and parental approval to wed.

The Senate passed the measure in March but will have to act again after the Assembly sought some tweaks. Gov. Cuomo has called the issue called it a priority.

The Assembly Democrats twice discussed the measure behind closed doors — including right before beginning a 12-day break that encompassed Memorial Day — and agreed to bring it to the floor for a vote.

“Children who are 14 should be worrying about their math test; they should not be married with marriage responsibilities,” said Assembly bill sponsor Amy Paulin (D-Westchester County). “They are too young. And for girls who are married to much older men, it’s abuse. It is time to change the law.”

To read the full story by Kenneth Lovett on The New York Daily News: Click Here